CBD Death Bubba by Air Cannabis Collective3 min read

CBD Death Bubba Cannabis Flower

This CBD Death Bubba is visibly high quality with a flavour profile that’s pronounced well, yet somewhat bland.

Today we look at CBD Death Bubba, a CBD dominant cultivar grown by the same producer of some of the higher quality culitvars I’ve reviewed as of late, like the Blue and Red Congo. I’m excited to review it because supposedly, this Death Bubba makes 5% THC and 12% CBD.

I cannot attribute CBD Death Bubba to a breeder. The vendor’s description says Death Bubba has been ‘meticulously manipulated’ to produce ~2:1 CBD to THC but they do not give a lineage. I can find some other listings for this cultivar that suggests the other counterpart is a CBD Afghani.

CBD Death Bubba Cannabis Flower

Visuals are excellent for this CBD Death Bubba. Buds are full to the point of being chunky. Besides the small amount of leaf left, there are few blemishes along the surface. The pistils are numerous, shifting the look of these flowers towards the dark brown shades.

Moisture content is excellent on this CBD Death Bubba. Although they feel outwardly dry, these flowers grid to small granules that remain slightly cohesive. I’d call this combustion quality, so I smoked it, but I don’t really have any complaints or compliments– it was functional.

Here is how the grinds look, I am favourable on them.

Scent of these flowers are woodsy and spicy, with bits of green pine tying in the profile. It interprets darker, warm and comforting, but rather bland. A touch of pungency is released when these flowers are ground, but it’s not enough to give the profile more character.

Flavours are softened earths, light and sandy, accented by exotic spice and hollow woods. The CBD Death Bubba profile drops the aggressive fuel notes of the original Death Bubba, and amplifies the softer afghani-type notes with a few new flavours to the mix.

This listing has a photo of the testing output, I thought I would show it. Apart from being more than a year old, it doesn’t touch on pesticides, but it does give an indication towards the cannabinoid content of the flower we review here. I imagine this particular flower is from a subsequent batch, but they serve as a rough guideline of content.

CBD Death Bubba Testing
ACMedical Screenshot

This was $12 per gram at the vendor, ACMedical. That price is comparable to the average of the legal online store in Alberta at the time of writing. In terms of illicit cannabis, $12 per single gram is expensive, I am used to seeing ~$10.25 per single gram for pools of 100,000+ listings summer of 2018. Bulk discounts brought the average down to the low $8 per gram range on an ounce purchase. Depending on where you look, quality product can be found at the $4-6 per gram for a 3.5 gram purchase.

I personally don’t agree that legality differentiates quality, but this CBD Death Bubba is better quality than most legal cannabis I review. Basic testing is lacking but, legal or not, I suppose the consumer inevitably has trust their source. However, I think the bottom line here is some of the people who choose to use cannabis as a medicine may be sensitive to a pesticide or microbial growth, and they may not feel comfortable using something like this.

Grow your own. As mentioned previously, I can’t find a breeder for CBD Death Bubba. Perhaps these genetics are available regionally, you’d have to know someone but I cannot be sure. Lately, only the flowers from unattractive genetics came with seeds, such is life I suppose.

I’m interested in price and quality in the legal and illegal cannabis markets, especially during the transitional time where legalization is new and legislation for extracts is still being prepared. If you are too, I’d suggest checking out the @CBDmason twitter feed. They’re posting pictures of illicit cannabis that I think gives an example of the high quality flower one can purchase from a traditional storefront dispensary in BC, it often looks very different to what I review here via online purchases.

CBD Death Bubba Cannabis Flower